Now showing 1 - 2 of 2
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Symmetry Is Not a Universal Law of Beauty
    (SAGE, 2019)
    Leder, Helmut
    ;
    Tinio, Pablo P. L.
    ;
    Brieber, David
    ;
    Kröner, Tonio
    ;
    ;
    Rosenberg, Raphael
    Scientific disciplines as diverse as biology, physics, and psychological aesthetics regard symmetry as one of the most important principles in nature and one of the most powerful determinants of beauty. However, symmetry has a low standing in the arts and humanities. This difference in the valuation of symmetry is a remarkable illustration of the gap between the two cultures. To close this gap, we conducted an interdisciplinary, empirical study to directly demonstrate the effects of art expertise on symmetry appreciation. Two groups of art experts—artists and art historians—and a group of non-experts provided spontaneous beauty ratings of visual stimuli that varied in symmetry and complexity. In complete contrast to responses typically found in non-art experts, art experts found asymmetrical and simple stimuli as most beautiful. This is evidence of the effects of specific education and training on aesthetic appreciation and a direct challenge to the universality of symmetry. © The Author(s) 2018.
  • Publication
    Open Access
    Beyond demand: Investigating spontaneous evaluation of chord progressions with the affective priming paradigm
    (Univ. of California Press, 2011-09)
    Müller, Mira
    ;
    Klein, Julian
    ;
    WE ASSUME THAT EVALUATIVE PROCESSES IN RESPONSE TO musical stimuli can occur spontaneously without explicit demand, and that these responses are important for the emergence of emotions evoked by music. Two versions of the affective priming paradigm served to study spontaneous evaluation of music. In Experiment 1, a lexical decision task (LDT) and in Experiments 2 and 3, an evaluative decision task (EDT) was employed. A total of 20 original four-part, five-chord piano sequences with no specified harmonic resolution were used as primes. During the LDT, congruency in valence of prime-target pairs did not affect response times to the targets. However, for the EDT, significant effects of priming were obtained, indicating that spontaneous evaluations of primes must have occurred. No moderating influences of music expertise or any other person variable on spontaneous evaluation were observed. The diverging results of LDT and EDT point to the possibility that spontaneous evaluative processes are sensitive to context manipulations. Results are discussed with reference to harmonic and semantic priming studies. © 2011 by the Regents of the University of California All Rights Reserved.