Now showing 1 - 10 of 17
  • Publication
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    Aesthetic emotions are a key factor in aesthetic evaluation: Reply to Skov and Nadal (2020)
    (American Psychological Association, 2020-07)
    Menninghaus, Winfried
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    Schindler, Ines
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    Wagner, Valentin
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    Wassiliwizky, Eugen
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    Hanich, Julian
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    Koelsch, Stefan
    Our theoretical model (Menninghaus et al., 2019) defines aesthetic emotions by reference to their role in aesthetic evaluation, and specifically as being predictive of aesthetic liking/disliking. Skov and Nadal (2020) dismiss the construct of "aesthetic emotions" as a "dated supposition" adopted from a "speculative" tradition and assert that there are no such emotions. Accordingly, they question all pieces of empirical evidence we referred to as supporting our model. In our response, we rebut these objections point by point and defend as well as expand the empirical evidence in support of our model. (PsycInfo Database Record (c) 2020 APA, all rights reserved).
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    What Are Aesthetic Emotions?
    (American Psychological Association, 2019)
    Menninghaus, Winfried
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    Wagner, Valentin
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    Wassiliwizky, Eugen
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    Schindler, Ines
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    Hanich, Julian
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    Koelsch, Stefan
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    The distancing-embracing model of the enjoyment of negative emotions in art reception
    (2017)
    Menninghaus, Winfried
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    Wagner, Valentin
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    Hanich, Julian
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    Wassiliwizky, Eugen
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    Why are negative emotions so central in art reception far beyond tragedy? Revisiting classical aesthetics in the light of recent psychological research, we present a novel model to explain this much discussed (apparent) paradox. We argue that negative emotions are an important resource for the arts in general, rather than a special license for exceptional art forms only. The underlying rationale is that negative emotions have been shown to be particularly powerful in securing attention, intense emotional involvement, and high memorability, and hence is precisely what artworks strive for. Two groups of processing mechanisms are identified that conjointly adopt the particular powers of negative emotions for art's purposes. The first group consists of psychological distancing mechanisms that are activated along with the cognitive schemata of art, representation, and fiction. These schemata imply personal safety and control over continuing or discontinuing exposure to artworks, thereby preventing negative emotions from becoming outright incompatible with expectations of enjoyment. This distancing sets the stage for a second group of processing components that allow art recipients to positively embrace the experiencing of negative emotions, thereby rendering art reception more intense, more interesting, more emotionally moving, more profound, and occasionally even more beautiful. These components include compositional interplays of positive and negative emotions, the effects of aesthetic virtues of using the media of (re)presentation (musical sound, words/language, color, shapes) on emotion perception, and meaning-making efforts. Moreover, our Distancing-Embracing model proposes that concomitant mixed emotions often help integrate negative emotions into altogether pleasurable trajectories.
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    The emotional power of poetry
    (2017)
    Wassiliwizky, Eugen
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    Koelsch, Stefan
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    Wagner, Valentin
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    Menninghaus, Winfried
    It is a common experience-and well established experimentally-that music can engage us emotionally in a compelling manner. The mechanisms underlying these experiences are receiving increasing scrutiny. However, the extent to which other domains of aesthetic experience can similarly elicit strong emotions is unknown. Using psychophysiology, neuroimaging and behavioral responses, we show that recited poetry can act as a powerful stimulus for eliciting peak emotional responses, including chills and objectively measurable goosebumps that engage the primary reward circuitry. Importantly, while these responses to poetry are largely analogous to those found for music, their neural underpinnings show important differences, specifically with regard to the crucial role of the nucleus accumbens. We also go beyond replicating previous music-related studies by showing that peak aesthetic pleasure can co-occur with physiological markers of negative affect. Finally, the distribution of chills across the trajectory of poems provides insight into compositional principles of poetry.
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    The emotional and aesthetic powers of parallelistic diction
    (2017)
    Menninghaus, Winfried
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    Wagner, Valentin
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    Wassiliwizky, Eugen
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    Knoop, Christine A.
    Parallelistic features of poetic and rhetorical language use comprise a great variety of linguistically optional patterns of phonological, prosodic, syntactic, and semantic recurrence. Going beyond studies on cognitive facilitation effects of individual parallelistic features (most notably rhyme, alliteration, and meter), the present study shows that the joint employment of multiple such features in 40 sad and joyful poems intensifies all emotional response dimensions (joy, sadness, being moved, intensity, and positive affect) and all aesthetic appreciation dimensions (beauty, liking, and melodiousness) that we measured. Given that parallelistic diction is also used, to different degrees, in ritual language, commercial ads, political slogans, and everyday conversations, the implications of these findings are potentially far-reaching.
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Negative Emotions in Art Reception
    (Cambridge Univ. Press, 2017)
    Menninghaus, Winfried
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    Wagner, Valentin
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    Hanich, Julian
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    Wassiliwizky, Eugen
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    Koelsch, Stefan
    While covering all commentaries, our response specifically focuses on the following issues: How can the hypothesis of emotional distancing (qua art framing) be compatible with stipulating high levels of felt negative emotions in art reception? Which concept of altogether pleasurable mixed emotions does our model involve? Can mechanisms of predictive coding, social sharing, and immersion enhance the power of our model?
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Anger framed: A field study on emotion, pleasure, and art
    (American Psychological Association, 2016)
    Wagner, Valentin
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    Klein, Julian
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    Hanich, Julian
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    Shah, Mira
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    Menninghaus, Winfried
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  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Mapping the aesthetic space of literature "from below"
    (Elsevier, 2016)
    Knoop, Christine A.
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    Wagner, Valentin
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    Menninghaus, Winfried
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Art-elicited chills indicate states of being moved
    (American Psychological Association, 2015)
    Wassiliwizky, Eugen
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    Wagner, Valentin
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    Menninghaus, Winfried
  • Publication
    Metadata only
    Aesthetic Evaluations of Literary Genres: an Exploratory Study
    (International Association of Empirical Aesthetics, 2014)
    Knoop, Christine A.
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    Wagner, Valentin
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    Menninghaus, Winfried
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